eNews

EcoLogic eNews Survey: Tell us what you’d like to hear!

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Reason to get involved: This survey will help us gather the information we need to better communicate with you about issues and topics that most interest you. As you know, we work to empower rural and indigenous peoples to restore and protect tropical ecosystems in Central America and Mexico. Your responses will help us serve up the types of stories of impact you care about—through the channels you prefer and at the times you want to connect with us! It will also help us discover some of what’s working and what’s not, as well as new ways we can connect with you—our supporters, partners, allies, and friends!

What comes next: After you take this survey, we will analyze your responses to guide our content, timing, and methods of communication so that we can better tailor our eNews and communications to your interests and needs! Those who participate will have the opportunity to receive correspondence according to the interests they’ve defined in this survey.

For example, if you’d like to hear more about women’s empowerment in our Forest of the Water Spirit project in Totonicapán, Guatemala on weekends 8am-12pm, and you are interested in volunteering with us—to fundraise on our behalf while engaging in your favorite recreational activity—we’ll email you about all of that so that we can build an improved partnership with you!

Thank you for your kind support!

Take our survey!

A Deep dive into the Cerro de Oro Dam that Changed the Landscape of La Chinantla

Background

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In this map produced by EcoLogic intern Christine Gregory, you can see the state of Oaxaca highlighted in the inset map and the small green area showing the precise location of La Chinantla in Oaxaca’s northeast corner.

La Chinantla, a region located in the Northern part of the State of Oaxaca—which itself is nestled in the Southwestern corner of Mexico, is a highly biodiverse, mountainous landscape—considered one of the most ecologically complex regions of Oaxaca, and even the entire country. It is one of the few regions in Mexico where so many distinct ecosystems coexist in such proximity—vast, sprawling expanses of oak forest, lowland tropical humid forests, scrub and dry forests, cloud forests, and high evergreen forests cover this lush, humid land. La Chinantla is also the place the Chinantec and Mazatec people (whose total population numbers over 100,000) call home.

read more about La Chinantla.

Field Interviews from Mexico with Imelda Esteban Yescas & Jasmin Guadalupe

In order to get more stories directly from the field to you—our kind readers, supporters, allies, and friends—we have started implementing and experimenting with communications techniques. We aim to give EcoLogic field technicians an easy method to create consistent streams of stories and photos that will allow us to analyze, communicate, monitor, and evaluate the human elements of our conservation work—like empowerment and social change.

While we are still in the pilot stage of this process, these two stories were collected by Oaxaca Field Technician Severiana Domínguez González, whose brilliant work you’ve read about of before. Severiana, as usual, went above and beyond—providing us with short journalistic accounts of local beneficiaries who are involved in our fuel-efficient stove initiative in La Chinantla.

We hope you enjoy this close-up view of Severiana’s work and insights from two local women who partner with EcoLogic.

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Imelda Esteban Yescas

Inside Imelda Esteban Yescas’  Kitchen

By Severiana Domínguez González

Hear more from Imelda & Jasmin.

Local Partnerships and Self-determination in Pico Bonito, Honduras: An Interview with Warren Darrell

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Basilio Martinez and Warren Darrell of Ecologic with AJAASSPIB technician Roberto at the water source on the Coyoles river.

Last week, EcoLogic sat down with Warren Darrell, an EcoLogic Ambassador. Warren had previously spent time journeying around Honduras to places like Copán, Lempira, and Colón where he observed the prevalence of hillside agriculture and soil degradation, as well as emerging conservation strategies such as soil-conserving agroforestry. Warren told EcoLogic that over the years, through his travels and interests, he learned that the key to successful development and conservation projects is involving local people and their community organizations and helping them enact the change they want to see. In his own words, Warren supports organizations that have an approach to their work that align with his international aid mantra that “supporting the right people and organizations is more important than the amount of support,” and after visiting Honduras, he says EcoLogic’s work confirms that.

Hear more from Warren.

EcoLogic Ambassador in Action: My Trip to Pico Bonito, Honduras

This guest blog is written by Warren Darrell, a retired environmental engineer from northern Virginia, who became involved with EcoLogic in the summer of 2016 as a Steward of Nature (our monthly donation program). Having spent some time Honduras, Guatemala, and other Latin American countries to volunteer with various sustainable development organizations, he was intrigued by EcoLogic’s community-based approach to watershed conservation and sustainable agriculture. But giving monthly by himself wasn’t enough. Ultimately, he wanted to help EcoLogic raise funds as an Ambassador — EcoLogic’s volunteer fundraisers who help us spread the EcoLogic message and garner support from family, friends, and colleagues. And to do that, Warren wanted to visit our work in person so that he could witness and verify its impact.

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The water source in the mountainous rain forest, which we reached after a steep and slippery hike.

See more photos from the field.

An Association of Rural Villagers Leading by Example at the Landscape Scale in Honduras

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3D models of watersheds show community members where water collects and how it travels to their villages. This is a youth group constructing the model for the villages of San Juan and San Dimas in Honduras

In 2016, EcoLogic was invited by Dominique Calaganan, a member of our advisory committee, with whom we are connected to thanks to our relationship with the PARTNER network, to write an article on how our work at EcoLogic contributes to a global conversation about local governance in international development and conservation. We chose Honduras mainly because we wanted to help people see what good governance by-and-for local communities looks like, which is alive and well in the communities we support. But we also had the aim of helping our peers and other organizations learn from and replicate what we’ve done. We wanted to connect with academic audiences to give a humble example of what an international non-profit of our size can do to help facilitate and strengthen real grassroots efforts in practice. Perhaps most importantly, this article intended to continue to raise the profile of our inspiring partners in Honduras—because they deserve it.
Read on to see the full published article.

Fernando Recancoj’s Most Significant Change: Empowerment & Adaptation

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Fernando Recancoj stopping for a snapshot mid conversation with me next to the “viveros,” or tree nurseries, in Totonicapán

This week, in EcoLogic’s regional office in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala (known locally as Xela, a homage to its indigenous name Xelaju), EcoLogic Communications Officer, Riley Hunter, sat down with Fernando Recancoj, long-time EcoLogic Field Technician for our Totonicapán project to get a better idea of what makes EcoLogic unique, why Fernando has stayed so committed to EcoLogic for 9 years, and why he is confident that EcoLogic the best place for him to create change and help rural and indigenous communities conserve their natural resources in Totonicapán.
read on to hear more from Fernando.