Biodiversity catalog

Scarlet Macaw Scarlet Macaw

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The scarlet macaw inhabits a range from southeastern Mexico to Amazonian Brazil, Peru, and Bolivia; it is the national bird of Honduras. This particular species of macaw is easily recognizable by its red, yellow, and blue coloring and exceptionally long tail feathers. Hunting for the illegal pet trade and habitat loss are serious threats to the survival of this bird, although it does not have an official designation on the IUCN red list because not enough data is yet available. In several countries where EcoLogic works the birds numbers in the wild are known to be diminishing rapidly, so we have indicated its designation as vulnerable. Its numbers are stabilizing in areas where there are active breeding and reintroduction programs such as in parts of Costa Rica.

Guatemalan fir tree Guatemalan Fir

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An evergreen tree endemic to Guatemala, the Guatemalan fir has been listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List as its numbers are diminishing due to threats such as land conversion for crops and cattle grazing, timber and fuel wood harvesting, and forest fires, and seasonal cutting for Christmas trees. The largest remaining stand of Guatemalan Fir is in the Totonicapan forest, where since 2005 Ecologic has collaborated with the 48 Cantons at our Forest of the Water Spirit project site to plant more than 210,000 trees and construct eight tree nurseries where the fir, along with other native trees, are grown for reforestation efforts. 

Horned guan in the wild Horned Guan

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The horned guan is a land-based bird, similar to a turkey, and it is identified by its black plumage, red feet, and distinctive red horn on the top of its head. The bird lives in mountain forests in Mexico and Guatemala and travels singly, in pairs and in small family groups. The horned guan is an endangered species, and currently the population is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, as well as excessive hunting.

Neotropical Otter Neotropical Otter

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The neotropical otter lives in areas with extensive water networks that are clear and fast flowing. Traditionally, this species has been found in countries ranging from Mexico throughout Central America to as far south as Argentina, although sadly, it has been extirpated from much of its historical range. Nevertheless, the neotropical otter has adapted well to human development in some areas, and can be found living along agricultural lands, although it cannot survive in polluted waterways or high-silt rivers. This species feeds mainly on fish, crustaceans and mollusks, and breeds during the spring, yielding two to three pups per litter. Due to a lack of recent population data, it has not been classified since 1994, when it was considered vulnerable. The primary threats to the neotropical otter include habitat loss and fragmentation, pollution of waterways, and hunting. 

Cerulean warbler Cerulean Warbler

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The cerulean warbler is a small songbird that summers and breeds in eastern and central North America, and migrates to parts of the Caribbean, Central America and South America for the winter months.  The male cerulean warbler sports bright sky-blue feathers hence the bird’s common English name.  Females have a predominantly pale green and greyish coloring with pale, black markings on the back. The cerulean warbler forages and nests in the canopies of deciduous trees, so it is rarely seen by people. The IUCN has classified this species as vulnerable, and much data still needs to be gathered about its life history and habits in order to better understand what conservation measures need to be taken. It is clear that one of the pressures on the bird’s survival is the continued loss and fragmentation of its habitat both on its breeding and wintering grounds.

Honduran Emerald Hummingbird Honduran Emerald Hummingbird

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Endemic to Honduras, the Honduran emerald hummingbird has been identified at four sites in that country, three of which around found in and near EcoLogic’s two project sites in the north. This hummingbird prefers arid thorn forests and enjoys a diet primarily consisting of 14 different plant species, including cacti and herbs. Currently considered endangered because of its low numbers and restricted range, the total population is estimated to only be between 350 and 1500 individuals. The primary threat to the survival of this hummingbird is the clearing of its habitat for farming and cattle grazing. 

 

 

Giant Anteater Giant Anteater

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The largest living anteater species, the giant anteater was historically native to a range that stretched from Honduras to Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay. The species is known for its long, unique nose that holds a tongue that can grow up to 50 centimeters in length and is used to reach ants and termites deep in their nests. The giant anteater’s large body size, specific diet, slow movement and low reproductive rate all result in a species that is not easily adaptable to a changing environment and increasing threats. Habitat loss, road kills and death by fire and hunting have led to a steep population decline. Currently it is classified as a species vulnerable to extinction.