Recent News

Connecting the Dots: Local to national forest carbon monitoring in Mexico

EcoLogic believes that local level carbon monitoring can and should be conducted by the people living in and around high-carbon forests if the sector is to be successful in the long-run.

A small gathering of EcoLogic staff and partners in the Lacandón Jungle, Chiapas, Mexico

A small gathering of EcoLogic staff and partners in the Lacandón Jungle, Chiapas, Mexico

Here’s why local people are critical: Mexico currently uses satellite images and some field-based data to quantify forest cover and thus estimate how much carbon is stored in its forests.  This data is called the national forest and soil inventory.  However, the satellite images themselves cannot determine the species, height or exact number of trees in a given area, nor can they measure the carbon stored in soil or dead wood.  Furthermore, the collection of field based data is challenging because of the difficult terrain, remote areas, and mistrust of outsiders within indigenous territories.  This is where local people fit in.

Read more about local peoples’ involvement in forest monitoring >>

GIS: Isn’t that Spatial?

Christine Gregory recently finished a GIS internship with EcoLogic, where she helped us represent environmental data in maps of our project sites.

From left, Anne Elise Stratton (Program Officer for Institutional Development), Christine Gregory, and Gabriela González (Regional Program Director) in Cambridge

From left, Anne Elise Stratton (Program Officer for Institutional Development), Christine Gregory, and Gabriela González (Regional Program Director) in Cambridge

Some may think Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are just software used to make maps (think about Google Maps), but that’s just the start of its vast and varied powers!

My interest in GIS started last year in the introductory course at Tufts. I walked into class with little idea of what GIS was, just knowing I was about to fulfill a tech requirement for graduation. Shortly after, I realized just how useful and versatile GIS was as a tool for solving spatial problems and how I, as a Geography enthusiast, could convert my excitement over atlases into a technical skill.

Read more about Christine’s work with GIS for EcoLogic >>

EcoLogic in France: Our take on the Paris COP

Dave Kramer, Senior Manager for Impact, Learning and Innovation, participated in the events surrounding the 21st meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) held in Paris in December 2015. Dave has been with EcoLogic for over 10 years and serves as a key representative of our model and approach with peers and allies.

Dave Kramer, Senior Manager for Impact, Learning and Innovation, with Sarah Lupberger, recipient of a Fulbright-Clinton Placement in the Peruvian Ministry of Environment

Dave Kramer, Senior Manager for Impact, Learning and Innovation, with Sarah Lupberger, recipient of a Fulbright-Clinton Placement in the Peruvian Ministry of Environment

You might be wondering: Was EcoLogic at the Paris COP events at the end of last year? And does it have an opinion on the Paris Agreement I’ve been hearing about? Well, yes we were; and yes we do (Note: EcoLogic wasn’t a part of the official Paris COP negotiations, but participated in side events and conferences). Coming back, we are bursting at the seams with new reflections and insights, and we made a lot of new friends and potential collaborators with whom we’re excited to engage in 2016.  Our aim in this post is to provide a bit of background and overview of EcoLogic’s experience in Paris and dish up a curated list of what we see as some of the best articles, blog posts, and op-eds that have been published in the weeks since the agreement was reached. Undoubtedly we have missed many, and we would love your suggestions and comments on this post. No matter what, we ended the year on a hopeful note, and we hope you will join us in committing to taking on the critical thinking and tangible action needed for us to solve the climate challenges facing us in the years to come.

Read more of EcoLogic’s takeaways from the COP >>