Biodiversity catalog

Great Green Macaw Great Green Macaw

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The great green macaw, found in Central and South America, is the largest parrot species in the region. Easily recognized by its vibrant lime green feathers, red-feathered forehead, and multi-colored tail feathers, the great green macaw inhabits humid, wet lowland foothills and dry deciduous forest and prefers to settle in areas where two distinct habitats overlap, also known as edge or ecotone habitats. In the wild, the global population of this bird is estimated at 2,500 mature individuals. The IUCN Red List classifies the great green macaw as endangered, and its numbers continue to decline due to habitat loss and hunting and poaching for the pet trade.

 

 

 

 

 

Golden-cheeked Warbler Golden-Cheeked Warbler

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The golden-cheeked warbler spends its summers in Texas in the United States and winters in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. Known by its dark black coloring, white markings and underbelly, and yellow head, the golden-cheeked warbler only builds its nest from the bark of the Ashe juniper tree (Juniperus ashei). The  golden-cheeked warbler is endangered due to the continuing decline and fragmentation of its summer and wintering habitats.

Margay, tree ocelot Margay

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The margay is a small, spotted cat that is most active during twilight and evening hours. This cat—which is smaller than an ocelot but otherwise similar looking—spends most of its time in trees but moves to the ground while hunting for small mammals, birds, and reptiles. The margay lives in very low densities throughout its habitat range, usually with less than five individuals found per 100 square kilometers. Its range includes areas of southern Mexico through Central America and into the Amazonian basin, reaching as far south as Argentina and Uruguay. The IUCN Red List classifies this feline as near threatened because of habitat loss, habitat fragmentation and illegal hunting and trade as a pet and for its fur. 

Barber's sheep frog Barber’s Sheep Frog

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The Barber’s sheep frog inhabits humid, pine-oak forests and smaller microclimates, favoring short grasses, meadows, and fruit and coffee groves. The frog breeds in temporary to semi-permanent pools, making this species highly dependent on rainfall. The geographic range of the Barber’s sheep frog spans from Chiapas, Mexico through Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras. The IUCN Red List classifies this frog as vulnerable because of habitat loss. Longer and more severe droughts have also had a negative impact on the Barber’s sheep frog’s population.

Guatemalan Bromeliad Salamander Guatemalan Bromeliad Salamander

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The Guatemalan bromeliad salamander is endemic to western Guatemala,and makes its home in fallen logs and stumps in moist mountain and lowland areas. It is in the plethodontidae family of salamanders which are known as “lungless salamanders” because they breathe entirely through their skin and mouth lining, making them dependent on living in a constantly humid habitat. The Guatemalan bromeliad salamander is critically endangered due to deforestation and resulting habitat loss. This salamander’s population is severely fragmented and is currently estimated to reside within less than 90 square kilometers, an area that includes Ecologic’s Indigenous Peoples for Thriving Ecosystems in Northern Guatemala project site. 

Crested Eagle Crested Eagle

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This large but slender neotropical eagle occurs in very low densities, requiring large areas of appropriate habitat, and is mostly found in humid, lowland rain forest. Feeding largely on tree dwelling mammals and birds, it has also been known to consume snakes and juvenile monkeys. The IUCN Red List has classified the crested eagle as near threatened because of habitat loss and hunting; in Mexico it is listed as endangered. For nesting, the eagle prefers large trees that have clear overviews of jungle canopy, and as these mature trees are lost due to logging, this may also be adversely impacting the eagle’s population numbers. 

Baird's tapir Baird’s Tapir

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The Baird’s tapir lives in small family groups and spends large portions of time in and around streams and rivers. While maintaining regular walking paths through its habitat, the Baird’s tapir primarily eats leaves, seeds, and young plants. Tapirs are noted for their long, 13-month gestation periods. Once born, a young tapir will stay with its mother for up to two years. The historical habitat of the Baird’s tapir extended through southern Meixco, Belize (where the tapir is the national animal), Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and north-western Colombia. Currently an endangered species, it is now missing from large areas of the region due to habitat loss and fragmentation, and has been lost in significant numbers due to hunting and poaching.  A docile creature, it is also a key prey species for many apex predators including the jaguar.